Start-ups the good the bad and the ugly!

THE GOOD

It’s refreshing to meet a team that are aligned, receptive and reactive to the importance of regulation and current thoughts on the progression and integration of technology within health and social care.

I recently met with the team who are striving to develop tech solutions for the industry and witnessed their commitment to continuously engage with experienced individuals throughout the sector. This is testament to how success can be gained by undertaking extensive research and connecting with industry experts. It’s refreshing to meet a team that are aligned, receptive and reactive to the importance of regulation and current thoughts on the progression and integration of technology within health and social care. There’s a great future ahead for CareLineLive and they deserve continued success with their ever evolving product.

THE BAD

In terms of tech development, tech delivery and growth of investment: lack of knowledge can go a long way to company instability and potential collapse.

Now, I don’t want to get caught up in sweeping generalisations, however I can reliably say that in terms of investor knowledge of the industry, there is at times, and I’m going to be kind here, a sketchy understanding of a sector that is complex and steeped in legislation and regulation. In terms of tech development, tech delivery and growth of investment: lack of knowledge can go a long way to company instability and potential collapse.

THE UGLY

The pressures impact on service delivery and CQC ratings which in reality often reflect, excessive investor pressure and lack of willingness to concede to the reality of what being part of health and social care really means.

Experiencing, and not from the sidelines, the pressure on tech developers and service managers from SOME investors to see rapid growth in a short period of time can bring individuals to their knees and ultimately services to a standstill. The pressures impact on service delivery and CQC ratings which in reality often reflect, excessive investor pressure and lack of willingness to concede to the reality of what being part of health and social care really means.

We all understand that if people are willing to invest in a product then they expect to see profit at an agreed point. However, the industry needs socially responsible investors whose practices align with an ethical understanding of the industry, the people who are employed in it who are ultimately responsible for delivering a caring, safe, responsive, effective and well-led service.

Merina Martin